Travel the World with Trip.com

A Guide To The Mob Museum In Sin City
Contents

A Guide To The Mob Museum In Sin City

TripBlog
Dec 5, 20193,1120

If you thought Sin City was all about games, gambling, pools, and parties, you are in for something else. The Mob Museum in Las Vegas is proof that this city has very broad umbrella when it comes to defining the word ‘interesting.’ Although Las Vegas is undoubtedly famous for its over-the-top party scenes, larger than life resorts, and enthralling casino floors, it does have other inviting tourist places that are well worth the visit. The Slotzilla zipline, Neon Museum, Thrill ride at the Stratosphere, Jimmy Kimmel’s Comedy Club, and Apocalypse Vegas are just some fun places that come to mind.

Contents

Facets of organized crime in the u.s
Famed gangsters in history
Famous wall from st. valentine’s day massacre
The real courthouse
Crime lab experience
Firearm training simulator
Dining nearby
Other museums in las vegas
Location & Tickets
A Guide To The Mob Museum In Sin City

Amongst a list of hundreds of bizarre, quirky, and riveting places to visit in Las Vegas, the Mob Museum is somewhere at the top. It is a non-profit organization that wants to further peoples comprehension of organised crime’s history and its bearing on society. The museum has arresting exhibits on organised crime, a section on firearm training, a crime lab experience, a massacre wall and several other compelling sections that pin you to your place, both in shock and in awe. The museum is housed in an institutional building that was once a US Post Office and a courthouse. It held some of Americas most defining and important trials in the organised crime world, including the well-known Kefauver hearings of the 1950s. It is impressive to know that visitors tread on the same grounds as mobsters, federal investigators, and informants once did. The museum’s collection includes memorabilia from crime bosses and inspectors alike and comprises guns, photographs, and journals. There is even a gory installation (inclusive of bloodstains and bullet holes) of a part of a wall from the St. Valentine’s day carnage.

A Guide To The Mob Museum In Sin City

The Mob Museum Las Vegas is divided into three easily navigable floors that can be reached by elevator or stairs. Here are a list of things that you get to experience at the Mob Museum:

Facets of organized crime in the u.s

The Mob Museum is the best place for crime junkies to revel in because of its multifaceted outlook into organized crime. The entire building is an immersive experience into the live and minds of men and women whose lives were ensnared by a composite web of crime. The exhibits begin at the basement, also known as The Underground, where visitors find a speakeasy and a distillery that are reminiscent of the Prohibition era when liquor was hard to come by, and hidden speakeasies quenched an entire nations thirst for illicit spirits. The basement even has a VIP room where one gets a taste of the past.

The 1st floor has some exciting exhibits like the 100 Years of Made Men (A hall of infamy with pictures and names of crime bosses, with crimes ranging from bootlegging to drugs, betting, trafficking, and even murder. You can also listen to recordings and look at listening devices as they evolved through the years. The star feature of the 1st floor is the Crime Lab experience. Also available on the 1st floor is an overview of organized crime in todays day and age. It extends beyond borders and nationalities and covers everything from trafficking exotic species to cybercrimes, and drug trafficking. The Firearm training simulator is another outstanding feature of the exhibits on floor one.

A Guide To The Mob Museum In Sin City

Photo: Instagram@otaku_rebel

The 2nd floor holds the actual court house from the Kefauver hearings, Mob’s greatest Hits (read murders), Web of Deceit (a complex view of how big names got caught in bad deals because of how patiently and relentlessly the crime bosses spread their sticky nets).

Lastly, on the 3rd floor, guests find gruesome evidence of massacres, exhibits about the Prohibition, Birth of the Mob, the Federal Agents tough battles with crime lords, and how the end of the Prohibition only fuelled newer sectors of organised crime.

The posh and glitzy theatre room shows clippings of gangster movies and brings in a swanky Hollywood feel to the ancient air of the museum.

Famed gangsters in history

A Guide To The Mob Museum In Sin City

Photo: Instagram@otaku_rebel

The exhibit named 100 years of Made Men is a classic wall of notoriety that profiles some of the most hardened criminals through the past century. Their backgrounds varied, and so did individual stories, but the mutual strand with every crime lord was the lust for wealth that gave them momentary gratification but never ensured long-lasting rewards. Guests get to see faces and history of crime bosses from the Bonnano crime family, Italian-Jewish mob, Tampa crime family, and countless other gang members from many walks of life. These mobsters were into bootlegging, illegal diversion of casino profits, skimming operations, and drug pedalling. Vito Genovese was one such mobster who was one of the most powerful gangsters of his time, but his desire to be the ‘Big Boss’ or chairman of the commission (the mafia’s national governing body) led to the unmasking of the secret society at their infamous Apalachin summit of 1957 which was held at the home of Joseph “Joe the Baker” Barbara’s house in Apalachin, New York. Over 60 underworld dons were detained and indicted following this fateful raid.

The mob museum also displays objects that belonged to Al Capone, Meyer Lansky, Sam Giancana Charlie Luciano, Benjamin Siegel, Mickey Cohen, Frank Rosenthal, and Tony Spilotro. Other artefacts at Mob Museum Las Vegas include jewellery, guns, weapons, hundreds of photos, and personal belongings of these mafia bosses.

Famous wall from st. valentine’s day massacre

The 3rd-floor exhibit coined Massacre Wall, is a grisly reminder of what organised crime was capable of unleashing on their rivals and competitors. On February 14th 1929, at a Lincoln Park garage in Chicago, seven gang members were lined up against the wall and shot to death by 4 unidentified assailants dressed as uniformed cops. Five of these members were known to be from George “Bugs” Moran’s North Side Gang. Others were associates and mechanics for the same gang. The perpetrators, although never identified beyond doubt, are suspected to have been the Egan’s Rat gang, working for Al Capone.

The bricks of the wall of S-M-C Cartage Company at 2122 N Clark Street were purchased by businessman George Patey in the 1960s before the place was torn down. He attempted to use the bricks from this infamous carnage at club restrooms and other places before it was finally acquired by the Mob Museum to be used as a part of their exhibits. Previous owners added paint and detailing around existing bullet holes in the bricks to enhance the gory effect.

The sole witness of the St. Valentine’s day massacre was a dog named Highball. The dog, belonging to John May, the mechanic and one of the victims, was found chained to the axel of a truck in the garage, amongst a bloodied floor with shell casings. The dog is said to have been too distraught after witnessing the deaths and had to be put down by police soon after.

Although several investigations were conducted and many leads pursued, no conclusive evidence was ever found to make a definitive arrest on this case and most names associated with the initial investigation were murdered by 1935, and the rest were arrested on other charges. The case, however, opened peoples eyes to what crime lords and their gangs were capable of.

The real courthouse

The early 1950s saw a time when violence perpetrated by organised crime came out into the open, and the public heard more about its caustic influence on society. Influencers and leaders began demanding action from the governing bodies. Estes Kefauver, a freshman U.S senator, seized this opportunity and began chairing a committee entrusted with investigating and exposing the world of organised crime. The committee was named the Kefauver committee, and it held hearings in 14 cities around the country. One such hearing was held inside a courtroom in the Mob museum building. This courtroom has been retained as it was and is now used to rerun televised editions of the hearings.

The Kefauver hearings established the thriving presence of a national crime syndicate and went on to expose lax enforcement laws. The likes of Frank Castello were subpoenaed to appear before the committee and eventually even made appearances in court.

Senator Kefauver from Tennessee was at the time running mate to presidential candidate Adlai Stevenson who lost to Eisenhower and Nixon.

Crime lab experience

The best detection and clues are found in labs most of the time. Forensic evidence plays a huge role in how cases are solved and criminals identified. Understanding the cruciality of the crime lab, the Mob Museum introduced a hands-on experiential lab to their exhibit on the 1st floor. This lab is an interactive hypermedia exhibit that lets guests discover the work of medical examiners, crime scene investigators, ballistics experts, and fingerprint analysts to secure relevant information and distinguish how and why crimes were committed.

Death investigation at a forensic lab is of utmost importance. Guiding principles for autopsies still follow those established by German pathologist Rudolph Virchow. The lab allows guests to make deductions based on cuts and wounds, and other markings on the body. Autopsy reports based on such a study allow pathologists to make deductions about manner, cause, and mechanism of death.

The guests are then allowed to use fingerprint identifiers where they try to match the minutiae like arches, loops, and whorls. The study is known as Dactyloscopy and the technology used to capture and scan prints in known as biometric technology. Guests at Mob Museum Las Vegas are also exposed to other kinds of evidence that are tested at labs, like information discs, animal droppings, hair, dead flies, maggots, weapons, mud, or tire treads.

Techniques like DNA profiling, fingerprint dusting, and the study of firearm barrel patterns, bullets, etc also discussed at the crime lab. English geneticist Alec John Jeffreys is credited for developing the techniques involved in DNA profiling and fingerprint analysis, back in the 1050s.

Participants at the crime lab experience must be above the age of 11. The exhibit is functional from 10am to 7pm with each experience lasting 30 minutes.

Firearm training simulator

The state of the art firearm training simulator on the 1st floor puts guests in the shoes of police men and federal agents by exposing them to different training exercises that real officers undergo to prepare for difficult situations. Digital and real-life role playing scenarios allow patrons to feel real-time thrilling responses to situations. As part of the orientation, each guest is told about the complexity and speed required in live use-of-force scenarios. Also, they are given C02 pistols and police belts to wear throughout the exercise. Exhibits in this section of the Mob Museum also speak to guests about factors that influence responses to perceived and real threats. Particular emphasis is placed on the use of deadly force in certain situations.

Patrons must be above the age of 16 to participate in the firearm simulation and minors require adult consent. The timing for the simulation is 10.30am to 6.30pm on all days.

Web Of Deceit

The Web of Deceit exhibit is an intriguing experience. It emphasises on the extent to which underworld crime lords manipulated the system, people, and situations with lies, deceit, fraudulent promises and threats. Often politicians and business influencers got into bad dealings with the mob and remained snared in the webs of the underworld. Jackie Presser, a leader of Teamster Union, was on the transition team of Ronal Regan but he was a man known to have several mob connections. Jack Ruby was a man with mob connection and was convicted of killing Kennedy assassin Lee Harvey Oswald. Speculations are rife that the Kennedy assassination too, was mob orchestrated, as was his presidential win in 1960.

It was unsaid that once you were in, there was no way out. Anybody who ever tried to be a good Samaritan again simply disappeared without a trace. One such case was the disappearance of Jimmy Hoffa, the Teamster Union boss who vanished in 1975 and even his body was never recovered. It was assumed that he was the prey of a mob hit. The Mob Museum las Vegas has artefacts, pictures and news clippings related to many such events.

Wiretapping Interactive

As New York’s mafia don John Gotti famously said once “Don’t ever say anything that you don’t want played back to you someday,” voice recordings and wiretapping were efficient ways to indict criminals. Gotti’s own voice, unfortunately, can be heard on a huge chorus of mobster voices caught on bugs and wiretaps. The Listening In exhibit of the Mob Museum has real FBI recordings of mobsters conversations.

Joaquin “Jack” Garcia was an amazing undercover FBI agent who, with the help of his recordings, busted and took down mafia capo Greg DePalma. He went by the name Jack Falcone while working with the Gambino crime family. The exhibit even includes a duplicate of the phone that was given to Garcia by DePalma. As undercover agents, every man had to understand their recording tool very well. If a device blinked or made a noise, it would blow the cover in a jiffy.

Despite many such hazards, several FBI agents managed to use wiretaps, bugs, and recording devices to bring down crime families.

Dining nearby

Three floors of exciting exhibits and simulations can leave you zapped of energy. You can head down to Seigel’s 1941 in El Cortez. This remake of an old flame diner is named after a mafioso owner of yesteryears. Pick a red power booth that is in keeping with everything that you just witnesses at the Mob Museum, and enjoy a nice burger.

Later in the evening, you can swing by Therapy, a lounge bar, and restaurant on Fremont street. You can also head down to any of the restaurants at Gold Nuggets, The D Las Vegas, or Four Queens. All of these are on Fremont street too. If you are craving Japanese food, head to Hokkaido Teppanyaki Hibachi Steak House. Pizza Rock, Triple George grill, and Hogs and Heifers are all close by on 201 N 3rd street.

Other museums in las vegas

The Mob Museum isn’t the only museum in Sin City. For those who are interested in such tourist destinations, here is a list of other museums in Las Vegas:

Location & Tickets

The Mob Museum is positioned in the heart of Las Vegas on Stewart Avenue and 3rd Street next to Main Street. It is open from 9am to 9pm every day of the week.

Address: No.300E, Stewart Avenue, Las Vegas, Nevada 89101, United States.

Phone:(702)229-2734

Tickets are priced at $27 per individual, but for a price you can add a whole lot of other‘experiences’like the crime lab and firearm training. An all-access pass for the whole day, which includes all these experiences, will cost $42. Non-English speakers may value the multilingual audio excursion at $4 or the guided tour at $10.Senior citizens,military and law enforcement officers,and teachers get discounted tickets at $21, The prices are $17 for children between the age of 11-17 and for students. Children below the age of 10 are not charged for entry into the museum.

Disclaimer: This article has been used directly from the Qingqi Qiu Platform, the copyright belongs to the original author. If there is any discrepancy with the copyright please contact us directly and we will immediately delete the content.Index for Network Information Infringement Protection
Like
Locations Featured in This Article
What's Trending

Trip Moments

By Vin.C

In Las Vegas

By Vin.C

In Las Vegas

By Jihan Adelia Mardova

In Las Vegas

By Jihan Adelia Mardova

In Las Vegas

By Jihan Adelia Mardova

In Las Vegas

By Jihan Adelia Mardova

In Las Vegas

Related Hotels