Take You to Play: Malacca, Kuala Lumpur! Take You to Eat: Authentic Cuisine in Kuala Lumpur

TripBlog
Dec 27, 2019

Malacca

Contents

  • Malacca
  • Authentic Cuisine in Kuala Lumpur
  • Important Notes on Kuala Lumpur Visits

Porta De Santiago (A Famosa) is also known as the Old Gateway. The gate is an example of old European architecture with a rough pattern carved on the gate and a rectangularly arched door at the top, which gives the appearance of a gate wearing a hat. The cannon tower on the right side has been preserved down to the present day.

Take You to Play: Malacca, Kuala Lumpur! Take You to Eat: Authentic Cuisine in Kuala Lumpur

The Stadthuys, a Dutch building and former residence of Han Wenjiang, is a beautiful Gothic structural that faces the sea. The locals call it the "Red Dutch House.”

Take You to Play: Malacca, Kuala Lumpur! Take You to Eat: Authentic Cuisine in Kuala Lumpur

Melaka & Jonker Street Malacca are the alternative names of Malacca. It is a state in Malaysia in the southern part of the Malay Peninsula on the Straits of Malacca. The capital of Malacca is also named Malacca. Jonker Walk is also called “Cultural Street” or “Antique Street.” It takes less than 5 minutes to go from Dutch Square to Jonker Walk via a bridge that crosses the Malacca River, which brings us to Jalan Hang Jebat, the main road on Jonker Walk. The lanes on the left and right side of the road are part of the Jonker Walk area. Jonker Walk has 300 years of Malaccan history with many antique shops, entertainment centers, restaurants, and stores full of local specialty products. Traveling down Jonker Walk, visitors can see many Chinese provincial assembly halls, which have the appealing qualities of antique buildings.

Take You to Play: Malacca, Kuala Lumpur! Take You to Eat: Authentic Cuisine in Kuala Lumpur

Authentic Cuisine in Kuala Lumpur

Nasi Lemak is made with rice, coconut milk, pandan juice, and ginger. The mixture is steamed and served with cucumber slices, curry chicken and peanuts. It is the most traditional and popular dish in Malaysia. Satay is usually marinated lamb, beef or chicken in skewers and grilled with charcoal. It is served with satay dipping sauce, onion and cucumber.

Take You to Play: Malacca, Kuala Lumpur! Take You to Eat: Authentic Cuisine in Kuala Lumpur

It is delicious and cheap. Do not miss out on the steamed Eagle Ray, a stingray that is flat with a long tail. It is typically steamed with a variety of sauces, an inexpensive and delicious stable food for the locals. Place banana leaves on with different spices, the side dishes are ladies’ fingers (okra) and beans. A spicy Portuguese influenced dish with some sweet and sour flavors like Tom Yum Kung. It has a rich spicy flavor.

Take You to Play: Malacca, Kuala Lumpur! Take You to Eat: Authentic Cuisine in Kuala Lumpur

Important Notes on Kuala Lumpur Visits

Essential items for travel to Kuala Lumpur include: a passport, cash, credit card(s), plane tickets, shorts, toiletries, power adaptor(s) (Malaysia uses a British three-pronged plug. The voltage is the same as mainland China, so you need to bring a power adaptor), a camera, notepad, pen, mosquito repellent, commonly used medicines, and slippers (Malaysia is hot year round, people on the street typically wear slippers), sunscreen, swimwear, and more. 1. The Malays are enthusiastic, polite, generous, and courteous. At a Malay home, guests should pay attention to their manners and respect the elderly. If both parties are Muslim, the guests are mainly greeted with a specific Islamic greeting. When entering the door, guests must take off their shoes at the door or staircase before entering the house unless they have permission from the owner. After entering the house, both the host and the guest greet each other and shake hands. When shaking hands, only lightly grasp the hands of the person in front of you, then put your hand in front of your forehead to show your sincerity. 2. When you see other guests in the house, you must walk in front of them with your head down saying “I'm sorry, please excuse me,” then find your seat. You cannot cross one leg over the other when you sit down, particularly not in front of elders. Women should sit with feet close together to show elegance. If you sit on the ground, it is better for men to sit cross-legged and the woman to kneel instead of sitting with their legs straight out. 3. The host will provide drinks and snacks for guests. It will offend the host if the guests don’t make use of the drinks or snacks. When the guests leave, the guests should let the host know, and the host usually walks the guests to the door. Guests are not invited to visit at dusk, as Muslims pray at this time, therefore evening visits are normally after 8:30. Malays are used to eating with their hands, so they wash their hands thoroughly before meals. It would be considered rude to eat with the left hand, so the right hand must be used. If you have to eat or pick up your tableware with your left hand, you should first apologize to the others. During the meals, Malays don’t generally sit on chairs but place dishes on a mat, where everyone gathers around and eats together. Men sit cross-legged and women kneel with their bodies slightly leaning to the right. Older women can sit cross-legged, like men. Islamic believers are forbidden to drink, and guests generally do not consume alcohol. The drinks served are mostly hot tea, hot water, and coconut juice. Some Malays habitually chew betel nuts. When guests arrive, in addition to warm greetings, the host may express courtesy and sincerity by serving a betel nut plate so that the guests can have a chew. 4. The Malays regard the left hand as unclean. Therefore, when you meet and shake hands, you must use your right hand. When you pick up and hand things to others, you must use your right hand and not your left hand. It is considered rude to use your left hand. When you have to use your left hand, be sure to say, “I'm sorry.” 5. Malays believe that pointing at people with the index finger is an insult to others, so don’t do that. 6. Women must not reach out and ask for a handshake first. 7. The head is considered to be a sacred part of the body. When you see a child, do not touch their heads, in order to avoid an unpleasant situation. 8. When sharing a meal with a Muslim, don't encourage them to drink alcohol and avoid ordering the dishes made with pork. 9. Malays do not like others to ask their age. It is considered rude to ask others’ ages. 10. Malaysia does not prohibit polygamy, so don't talk about other people's family affairs. You cannot address elderly people as “you,” but should refer to them as “Mr.,” “Mrs.,” or “Ms.”