Popular Religious Sites Attractions in Japan

Kiyomizu-dera Temple
Kyoto·Japan
4.6/5
2,891 Reviews
Temple
Kiyomizu-dera Temple is an ancient temple in Kyoto and was listed as a World Cultural Heritage site in 1994. The veranda of the temple suspended over the moutain is a national treasure of Japan. It is surrounded by green trees and is full of cherry blossoms in spring. In autumn, the red maple leaves is another attraction. It is equivalent to Kinkaku-jiand Arashiyama, and is a famous historical site in Kyoto. The pilgrims or visiting tourists who come to worship year round come in non-stop.
Senso-ji
Tokyo·Japan
4.5/5
4,445 Reviews
Temple
Historical Site
One of Tokyo’s oldest and most significant Buddhist temples, Senso-ji is located in the city’s Asakusa District. Dedicated to the Bodhisattva of compassion, the first temple was founded as far back as 645 CE. Destroyed during World War II, Senso-ji was eventually rebuilt and stands now as a symbol of rebirth and peace. Many small shops line the main street approaching the temple. It is a popular area for tourists and among the more well-known parts of Tokyo. Each spring a grand festival is held in and around Senso-ji. Over the course of a few days upwards of 2 million people visit the temple complex.
Kinkaku-ji
Kyoto·Japan
4.6/5
2,444 Reviews
Temple
Kinkaku-ji is an ancient Japanese temple in Kyoto. Completed in 1397, it originally served as the villa of shogun Ashikaga Yoshimitsu, but was later transformed into a Zen Buddhist temple. Originally named Rokuon-ji (literally "Deer Garden Temple"), it is also known as the Temple of the Golden Pavilion owing to the gold foil that the outside of the building is wrapped in. In addition to being a famous tourist attraction, Kinkaku-ji has also been designated as a National Treasure by the Japanese government and is a symbol of Kyoto.
Fushimi Inari Taisha
Kyoto·Japan
4.6/5
1,846 Reviews
Temple
Fushimi Inari Taisha is one of the oldest shrines in Kyoto. People come to worship Inari Okami, the god harvest and commercial success. The Torii leading to the main shrine is a famous landscape of this shrine. This long and endless pathway is arranged from the foot of the mountain to the top of the mountain. It is one of the representative landscapes of Kyoto and has appeared in the movie “Memoirs of a Geisha”. Because the fox is regarded as the messenger of the Inari Okami, the fox-faced shaped emas are a major feature here.
Yasaka Shrine
Kyoto·Japan
4.5/5
768 Reviews
Temple
Located in the Higashiyama scenic area of Kyoto and commonly called Gion Shrine, Yasaka Shrine is the most important Shinto shrine of the approximately 3,000 sub-shrines throughout Japan. The rather unique mikoshi (divine palanquin) within allows visitors the chance to pray to the God of Beauty. The shrine's ritual activity is known as the Gion Festival (Gion Matsuri), which is one of the three great Shinto festivals of Japan, together with the Kanda Festival (Kanda Matsuri) in Tokyo and the Tenjin Festival (Tenjin Matsuri) in Osaka. Yasaka Shrine is also a popular hanami (cherry blossom viewing) site in spring.
Meiji Jingu
Tokyo·Japan
4.5/5
1,066 Reviews
Temple
Meiji Jingu is a Shinto shrine dedicated to the Emperor Meiji and his wife, Empress Shoken. It is located in Tokyo’s Shibuya ward. The shrine is surrounded by a forest park consisting of over 120,000 trees donated by people from all parts of Japan. Together with the adjacent Yoyogi Park, Meiji Jingu is part of a large greenspace in central Tokyo. Enormous torii, or gates, mark the entrance to the shrine complex. Because of its size and the relative seclusion it offers, Meiji Jingu is an extremely popular location. Many people come to spend time on the laws or to admire the wildflowers. It really is a beautiful place.
Todaiji
Nara·Japan
4.6/5
977 Reviews
UNESCO World Heritage-Cultural Site
Temple
Todaij, located on the east side of Nara, boasts a history of over 1,200 years. As one of the Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara, it has been listed as a World Cultural Heritage site. Jianzhen, an eminent monk of the Tang Dynasty in China, set up the temple here as the ordination hall for monks. The large bronze Buddha and the reconstructed East Hall are must-see attractions.
Tenryu-ji
Kyoto·Japan
4.5/5
480 Reviews
Temple
Tenryu-ji is a UNESCO World Heritage site constructed in 1339. Related to both the Ashikaga family and the Emperor Go-Daigo, the temple is held in high esteem but has suffered intense fire damage over the years, damaging its once pristine appearance. Designed by the celebrated Muso Soseki, the gardens combine aristocratic elegance with Zen Buddhist sensibilities. A seated Buddha from the Fujiwara period can be found inside the temple itself.

Religious Sites in Japan